Helping volunteers gain veterinary experience while improving animal health and welfare around the world.

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Animals are involved in many different activities which we carry out daily. They are responsible for maintaining the ecological cycle in a stable manner. Many students lack sufficient veterinary experience both in undergrad and in vet school. Students may gain insight through our programs to boost their career and also get to know the common issues that affect animals.

EXCITING NEWS! We have teamed up with a SPAY AND NEUTER Center in PANAMA! Calling all pre-vets, vet students and vet technicians! As one of our team members, you will be able to assist the vet, perform pre-op clinical exams, inject antibiotics & pain relief, observe surgery, place ET tubes, place IV catheters, monitor anesthesia, blood sampling, inject sedation, administer medication, calculate drug dosages, set up IV fluids, calculate IV fluid rates, give vaccinations, provide wound care (cleaning, stabilizing, bandaging,

Snares are horrible things! Temeza’s owner asked us to help as he cut a snare off him and the wound smelled funny. Poor Temeza had his penis sheath cut through by the snare so his penis essentially had no skin. WCCVC Chinta Dogs has sponsored the surgery to repair his genitals and clean the other (maggot filled) wound caused by this illegal hunting practice. This surgery is happening now so updates will come on his progress post-op.

Scud was rescued by Safari4u students and originally named “Muffin.” He was covered in mange and the only surviving member of his litter. Students treated his parasite burden (internal and external) and cleaned up his ears which had stuck together due to the injuries caused by the mange. Once he was better, he was formally adopted by Mark, who lives on the Safari4u property.

ALL HANDS ON DECK! This week our Vet Student course had an emergency cesarean section (aka C-Section). After a game capture for a reserve owner, we were asked to assist us for advice on his dog. Cesarean sections can be common in practice but they are used as an emergency procedure to help in whelping (dog giving birth) or with certain breeds who are known to have dystocia (difficulty giving birth).