Helping volunteers gain veterinary experience while improving animal health and welfare around the world.

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Surgery

Last week, we went in to see a lion cub that wasn’t doing too well. Unfortunately it wasn’t doing well with treatment and the judgment call was to euthanize it. On a happy note, our students were able to do a post mortem on it. There were 2 things of note were discovered- the heart had a fatty covering particularly around the left atrium and both kidneys were extremely discoloured.

A relaxed morning turned into a critical care case for a lion cub today! 🦁 The cub had been reportedly in and out of ill health for a week so Safari4u went to assess it to help with a treatment plan. Upon arrival, staff member Alex, realised it was critical and the decision was made to take it to Wild Coast Vet… after collecting it from the ground with the rest of the pride watching!

EXCITING NEWS! We have teamed up with a SPAY AND NEUTER Center in PANAMA! Calling all pre-vets, vet students and vet technicians! As one of our team members, you will be able to assist the vet, perform pre-op clinical exams, inject antibiotics & pain relief, observe surgery, place ET tubes, place IV catheters, monitor anesthesia, blood sampling, inject sedation, administer medication, calculate drug dosages, set up IV fluids, calculate IV fluid rates, give vaccinations, provide wound care (cleaning, stabilizing, bandaging,

Snares are horrible things! Temeza’s owner asked us to help as he cut a snare off him and the wound smelled funny. Poor Temeza had his penis sheath cut through by the snare so his penis essentially had no skin. WCCVC Chinta Dogs has sponsored the surgery to repair his genitals and clean the other (maggot filled) wound caused by this illegal hunting practice. This surgery is happening now so updates will come on his progress post-op.

ALL HANDS ON DECK! This week our Vet Student course had an emergency cesarean section (aka C-Section). After a game capture for a reserve owner, we were asked to assist us for advice on his dog. Cesarean sections can be common in practice but they are used as an emergency procedure to help in whelping (dog giving birth) or with certain breeds who are known to have dystocia (difficulty giving birth).