Helping volunteers gain veterinary experience while improving animal health and welfare around the world.

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Wildlife

Animals are involved in many different activities which we carry out daily. They are responsible for maintaining the ecological cycle in a stable manner. Many students lack sufficient veterinary experience both in undergrad and in vet school. Students may gain insight through our programs to boost their career and also get to know the common issues that affect animals.

Last week, we went in to see a lion cub that wasn’t doing too well. Unfortunately it wasn’t doing well with treatment and the judgment call was to euthanize it. On a happy note, our students were able to do a post mortem on it. There were 2 things of note were discovered- the heart had a fatty covering particularly around the left atrium and both kidneys were extremely discoloured.

A relaxed morning turned into a critical care case for a lion cub today! 🦁 The cub had been reportedly in and out of ill health for a week so Safari4u went to assess it to help with a treatment plan. Upon arrival, staff member Alex, realised it was critical and the decision was made to take it to Wild Coast Vet… after collecting it from the ground with the rest of the pride watching!

Students assisted in moving the lions at East London Zoo to their new half of their enclosure this morning. The new enclosure has been built within the standards of keeping predator species and one of our past students, Jessie, suggested that if a gateway was built between the two, the lions could use both sides and have more room as the zoo has no immediate plans for procurement of new predators. This was immediately taken onboard by the zoo and

The poaching crisis has hit close to home so affirmative action has been taken by some farms in the form of dehorning. Our students were able to assist with the dehorning of 2 White Rhino on Friday. South Africa is viewed as the primary custodian of Africa’s rhinos. With 18,796 white rhinos and 1,916 black rhinos as of last estimates at the end of 2010, this represents approximately 93% and 40% of the total white and black rhino populations respectively.

While our vets are the only ones able to legally immobilise the animals we treat, we still give students a chance to observe them at work, ask questions and we also train them in how to use the equipment (such as the dart gun) in safe situations. Using a capture gun/ dart gun/ Tranquilizer gun is a very handy tool used in game capture. With enough practice and precision it is very safe and effective to safely capture the animal